Mining Calculator Bitcoin, Ethereum, Litecoin, Dash and Monero

ButterflyLabs 600 GH Bitcoin Mining Card Pre-Order Doubts

ButterflyLabs 600 GH Bitcoin Mining Card Pre-Order Doubts submitted by Bicknellski to BitcoinMining [link] [comments]

BFL is possibly misleading customers to get pre-orders.

On their 300GH and 600GH cards BFL has now replaced the "Pre-Order" button with an "Order" button instead.
Nothing about the checkout procedure itself even hints this is a pre-order.
The few notices that these are pre-orders are at the main products page: Here Huh, look at that, those buttons say pre-order instead..
and some various text mostly near the bottom of the individual pages.
This is a pre-order. 28nm ASIC bitcoin mining hardware products are shipped according to placement in the order queue, and delivery may take 3 months or more after order. All sales are final.
I'm sorry but shouldn't the product name have "PRE-ORDER" affixed to it? Especially when it's in the cart..
I can easily skim the page, think I'm getting an awesome deal, add it to my cart and make full unrefundable payment without notice otherwise.
This strikes me as deceptive sales practices. Be alert guys!
submitted by Roobotics to BitcoinMining [link] [comments]

I have 20k to spend on mining gear.

Hey friends, I've found a hookup for cheap electricity. I've saved up 20k over the last few months, and I'm ready to start mining. I was thinking about going with butterfly labs and buying 10 of these https://products.butterflylabs.com/homepage-new-products/600-gh-bitcoin-mining-card.html to get 6000 GH. Does anyone know a cheaper do-it-yourself alternative?
submitted by Bandors to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Will I get a ROI?

bitcoinming.
I have been thinking of pre-ordering the: https://products.butterflylabs.com/600-gh-bitcoin-mining-card.html
Will I get a ROI?how long do these miners take to ship internationally?
submitted by I_am_not_a_neckbeard to BitcoinMining [link] [comments]

Questions about mining with ASICs

I'm looking into mining and based on my (albeit shitty) math I could make a truly absurd amount of money a few of the PCIe ASIC miners being peddled online.
Are these things too good to be true?
Namely this: https://products.butterflylabs.com/homepage-new-products/600-gh-bitcoin-mining-card.html
submitted by superAL1394 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Most efficient way to spend $4600 to $5000 on a mining build?

Hello everyone! I haven't posted here in awhile but I have some questions. Long story, I got into the LTC game about 6 months ago and you guys on here helped me build my first 3x7950 machine! It cost me $1400 and I've made about $7000 and sold off the hardware. I've learned a lot since then.
I'm now looking to get back into the game with more Money. I recently bought https://products.butterflylabs.com/homepage-new-products/600-gh-bitcoin-mining-card.html and I've been debating on buying 2 more of them, the only thing that scares me is when I will receive the product. I fear it might be useless mining bitcoin.
The other option is to build two new rigs with a total of 6 290x's. I've used coinwarz to check my profitability and it looks good but what also scares me is that Asic's will be coming to litecoin soon and I don't want to be priced out of the market as soon as I get back into it.
I'm looking for your opinions on what you feel the smarter thing would be to invest in. Invest in GPU miners and hope Asic miners don't show up for awhile or buy two more Asic miners for bitcoin and hope they get to me soon.
I've googled around and looked at bitcoin talk but I'm still debating the decision.
Let me know what you think. Thank you for your time!
submitted by ThatBlueKid to litecoinmining [link] [comments]

Extreme-noob here, would the saving and investment into this be worth it? In other terms, how much would 600 GH/s make, and does this actually do 600 GH/s?

https://products.butterflylabs.com/homepage-new-products/600-gh-bitcoin-mining-card.html
submitted by sigothegreat to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Is there any profit if I invested a large amount of money on mining rigs/cards?

I've read about people trying to invest a few hundred dollars on mining hardware and they are being told that they won't make any money. My question is, what about a larger investment. Lets say someone invested $5000? How about $10,000? Would that then be a good investment?
I was looking at this: https://products.butterflylabs.com/homepage-new-products/600-gh-bitcoin-mining-card.html
Could something like that be profitable?
submitted by GPGrieco to BitcoinMining [link] [comments]

WTF is BFL up to now? 600 GH/s Bitcoin Mining Card | 28nm Technology

WTF is BFL up to now? 600 GH/s Bitcoin Mining Card | 28nm Technology submitted by Naelr to planbshow [link] [comments]

About Ethereum mining pitfalls, risks, and threats

Bitcoin miners are massively switching to Ethereum. According to 8btc estimates, the payback period for a Bitcoin miner is 600 days, while for the same metric on Ether it only takes 200 days. But this goodness won’t last forever. Read about what threatens the development of Ethereum below.
Hardware and Filling – Halfway to Success
Experienced folks advise taking the most productive video cards, for example, the latest models from Nvidia and AMD. When choosing, pay attention to the amount of video memory (ideally from 2 GB), memory speed (with DDR 5 memory), bus width (better with a 256-bit bus), and cooling (basically there’s no competition to Radeon devices). Take Radeon RX 570, this 169 USD card produces 24-30 Mh/s, which is superb.
The Illusion of Stability
The entire multi-million community of Ether lovers trembled in early August when the Ethereum Classic network was subjected to several 51% attacks at once. In addition, in the first half of 2020 alone, over 5 attacks were carried out on popular DeFi platforms, including Balancer ($500,000 stolen) and bZx (17,500 ETH were stolen in total). Moreover, cybercriminals do not always use technical vulnerabilities, sometimes good old social engineering works.
Reduction of Reward
Ethereum developers have proposed to reduce the block mining reward by 75%. ConsenSys Managing Director John Leelik published the EIP-2878 proposal aimed at reducing inflation and preserving purchasing power. If supported, the reward will drop to 0.5 ETH.
The transition of ETH to ETH 2.0 (PoS)
We already wrote about this in the article "Problems of Ethereum Mining", and you can also watch the interview by Peter McCormack with the project founder Vitalik Buterin.
While the opportunity is still there, we offer everyone to get the most out of it and mine profitably. For example, take a closer look at the new CoinFLy ETH Pool, that nowadays offers more rewards than others, at least by 10%.
Profit That is Not Profit
A hidden and obvious problem is choosing the pool based on its profitability. If you only have a few capacities, then it is better to choose a pool that uses the PPS+ model, if you’ve got a lot of them, then a powerful pool with PPLNS is better. And if you’ve got so many capacities that there’s even enough for others, then you can also go SOLO, buddy. More details - here.
submitted by applesEgo to ethereum [link] [comments]

Ethereum mining pitfalls, risks, and threats

Bitcoin miners are massively switching to Ethereum. According to 8btc estimates, the payback period for a Bitcoin miner is 600 days, while for the same metric on Ether it only takes 200 days. But this goodness won’t last forever. Read about what threatens the development of Ethereum below.
Hardware and Filling – Halfway to Success
Experienced folks advise taking the most productive video cards, for example, the latest models from Nvidia and AMD. When choosing, pay attention to the amount of video memory (ideally from 2 GB), memory speed (with DDR 5 memory), bus width (better with a 256-bit bus), and cooling (basically there’s no competition to Radeon devices). Take Radeon RX 570, this 169 USD card produces 24-30 Mh/s, which is superb.
The Illusion of Stability
The entire multi-million community of Ether lovers trembled in early August when the Ethereum Classic network was subjected to several 51% attacks at once. In addition, in the first half of 2020 alone, over 5 attacks were carried out on popular DeFi platforms, including Balancer ($500,000 stolen) and bZx (17,500 ETH were stolen in total). Moreover, cybercriminals do not always use technical vulnerabilities, sometimes good old social engineering works.
Reduction of Reward
Ethereum developers have proposed to reduce the block mining reward by 75%. ConsenSys Managing Director John Leelik published the EIP-2878 proposal aimed at reducing inflation and preserving purchasing power. If supported, the reward will drop to 0.5 ETH.
The transition of ETH to ETH 2.0 (PoS)
We already wrote about this in the article "Problems of Ethereum Mining", and you can also watch the interview by Peter McCormack with the project founder Vitalik Buterin.
While the opportunity is still there, we offer everyone to get the most out of it and mine profitably. For example, take a closer look at the new CoinFLy ETH Pool, that nowadays offers more rewards than others, at least by 10%.
Profit That is Not Profit
A hidden and obvious problem is choosing the pool based on its profitability. If you only have a few capacities, then it is better to choose a pool that uses the PPS+ model, if you’ve got a lot of them, then a powerful pool with PPLNS is better. And if you’ve got so many capacities that there’s even enough for others, then you can also go SOLO, buddy. More details - here.
submitted by applesEgo to gpumining [link] [comments]

Mining pitfalls, risks, and threats in Ethereum network

Bitcoin miners are massively switching to Ethereum. According to 8btc estimates, the payback period for a Bitcoin miner is 600 days, while for the same metric on Ether it only takes 200 days. But this goodness won’t last forever. Read about what threatens the development of Ethereum below.
Hardware and Filling – Halfway to Success
Experienced folks advise taking the most productive video cards, for example, the latest models from Nvidia and AMD. When choosing, pay attention to the amount of video memory (ideally from 2 GB), memory speed (with DDR 5 memory), bus width (better with a 256-bit bus), and cooling (basically there’s no competition to Radeon devices). Take Radeon RX 570, this 169 USD card produces 24-30 Mh/s, which is superb.
The Illusion of Stability
The entire multi-million community of Ether lovers trembled in early August when the Ethereum Classic network was subjected to several 51% attacks at once. In addition, in the first half of 2020 alone, over 5 attacks were carried out on popular DeFi platforms, including Balancer ($500,000 stolen) and bZx (17,500 ETH were stolen in total). Moreover, cybercriminals do not always use technical vulnerabilities, sometimes good old social engineering works.
Reduction of Reward
Ethereum developers have proposed to reduce the block mining reward by 75%. ConsenSys Managing Director John Leelik published the EIP-2878 proposal aimed at reducing inflation and preserving purchasing power. If supported, the reward will drop to 0.5 ETH.
The transition of ETH to ETH 2.0 (PoS)
We already wrote about this in the article "Problems of Ethereum Mining", and you can also watch the interview by Peter McCormack with the project founder Vitalik Buterin.
While the opportunity is still there, we offer everyone to get the most out of it and mine profitably. For example, take a closer look at the new CoinFLy ETH Pool, that nowadays offers more rewards than others, at least by 10%.
Profit That is Not Profit
A hidden and obvious problem is choosing the pool based on its profitability. If you only have a few capacities, then it is better to choose a pool that uses the PPS+ model, if you’ve got a lot of them, then a powerful pool with PPLNS is better. And if you’ve got so many capacities that there’s even enough for others, then you can also go SOLO, buddy. More details - here.
submitted by applesEgo to CryptoCurrencies [link] [comments]

About problems of Ethereum miners

Bitcoin miners are massively switching to Ethereum. According to 8btc estimates, the payback period for a Bitcoin miner is 600 days, while for the same metric on Ether it only takes 200 days. But this goodness won’t last forever. Read about what threatens the development of Ethereum below.
Hardware and Filling – Halfway to Success
Experienced folks advise taking the most productive video cards, for example, the latest models from Nvidia and AMD. When choosing, pay attention to the amount of video memory (ideally from 2 GB), memory speed (with DDR 5 memory), bus width (better with a 256-bit bus), and cooling (basically there’s no competition to Radeon devices). Take Radeon RX 570, this 169 USD card produces 24-30 Mh/s, which is superb.
The Illusion of Stability
The entire multi-million community of Ether lovers trembled in early August when the Ethereum Classic network was subjected to several 51% attacks at once. In addition, in the first half of 2020 alone, over 5 attacks were carried out on popular DeFi platforms, including Balancer ($500,000 stolen) and bZx (17,500 ETH were stolen in total). Moreover, cybercriminals do not always use technical vulnerabilities, sometimes good old social engineering works.
Reduction of Reward
Ethereum developers have proposed to reduce the block mining reward by 75%. ConsenSys Managing Director John Leelik published the EIP-2878 proposal aimed at reducing inflation and preserving purchasing power. If supported, the reward will drop to 0.5 ETH.
The transition of ETH to ETH 2.0 (PoS)
We already wrote about this in the article "Problems of Ethereum Mining", and you can also watch the interview by Peter McCormack with the project founder Vitalik Buterin.
While the opportunity is still there, we offer everyone to get the most out of it and mine profitably. For example, take a closer look at the new CoinFLy ETH Pool, that nowadays offers more rewards than others, at least by 10%.
Profit That is Not Profit
A hidden and obvious problem is choosing the pool based on its profitability. If you only have a few capacities, then it is better to choose a pool that uses the PPS+ model, if you’ve got a lot of them, then a powerful pool with PPLNS is better. And if you’ve got so many capacities that there’s even enough for others, then you can also go SOLO, buddy. More details - here.
submitted by applesEgo to ethtrader [link] [comments]

Ethereum mining pitfalls, risks, and threats

Bitcoin miners are massively switching to Ethereum. According to 8btc estimates, the payback period for a Bitcoin miner is 600 days, while for the same metric on Ether it only takes 200 days. But this goodness won’t last forever. Read about what threatens the development of Ethereum below.
Hardware and Filling – Halfway to Success
Experienced folks advise taking the most productive video cards, for example, the latest models from Nvidia and AMD. When choosing, pay attention to the amount of video memory (ideally from 2 GB), memory speed (with DDR 5 memory), bus width (better with a 256-bit bus), and cooling (basically there’s no competition to Radeon devices). Take Radeon RX 570, this 169 USD card produces 24-30 Mh/s, which is superb.
The Illusion of Stability
The entire multi-million community of Ether lovers trembled in early August when the Ethereum Classic network was subjected to several 51% attacks at once. In addition, in the first half of 2020 alone, over 5 attacks were carried out on popular DeFi platforms, including Balancer ($500,000 stolen) and bZx (17,500 ETH were stolen in total). Moreover, cybercriminals do not always use technical vulnerabilities, sometimes good old social engineering works.
Reduction of Reward
Ethereum developers have proposed to reduce the block mining reward by 75%. ConsenSys Managing Director John Leelik published the EIP-2878 proposal aimed at reducing inflation and preserving purchasing power. If supported, the reward will drop to 0.5 ETH.
The transition of ETH to ETH 2.0 (PoS)
We already wrote about this in the article "Problems of Ethereum Mining", and you can also watch the interview by Peter McCormack with the project founder Vitalik Buterin.
While the opportunity is still there, we offer everyone to get the most out of it and mine profitably. For example, take a closer look at the new CoinFLy ETH Pool, that nowadays offers more rewards than others, at least by 10%.
Profit That is Not Profit
A hidden and obvious problem is choosing the pool based on its profitability. If you only have a few capacities, then it is better to choose a pool that uses the PPS+ model, if you’ve got a lot of them, then a powerful pool with PPLNS is better. And if you’ve got so many capacities that there’s even enough for others, then you can also go SOLO, buddy. More details - here.
submitted by applesEgo to Metaverse_Blockchain [link] [comments]

A 14-year-old's experience with Bitcoin

First-time poster here, don’t bully me, apologies for the potentially atrocious formatting :) TL;DR at the end
So in the wake of Bitcoin’s explosive rise in value and media attention, I’ve been encouraged by others to share my experience over the past few years as a miner. Here's my story (it's kinda long, you've been warned)

Humble Beginnings

It all started almost three years ago in the beginning of 2015 when Bitcoin flew under my radar. Looking into it, I admittedly wasn’t drawn in because of the decentralisation or the anonymous payments, I was hooked on the idea that anyone could get their hands on some just by running a program and leaving it to do its own thing. I know, how shallow of me. But the idea of making even a bit of money without ‘any work’ was convincing enough for 11-year-old me to do more digging into the matter.
To my disappointment, I soon found out that the era of mining Bitcoins with a PC’s CPU or GPU was long obsolete and instead it was all ASICs at that point.
So that summer, for my twelfth birthday, I got a little ASIC machine for €60, an Antminer U3. This little thing took up less space than a graphics card but could mine at 60 GH/s. Because, at the time, I didn’t have a controller device that could be kept up and running all day long so it could run the program that mined Bitcoin using the U3, I went ahead and got a Raspberry Pi. After setting up the Pi and installing all the necessary stuff (took an awfully long time), I connected it to AntPool and plugged the U3 in. Two days past and the mining pool sent the first Bitcoin I ever received to my wallet (I was using Blockchain.info). It was just 30 cents worth of BTC but I felt a bit of a rush because I was earning a bit of money through this completely new thing and the idea of that was thrilling.
Let’s back up for a second. I just used the term ‘earning’ as if I was profiting, and naive me 2 years ago was no different. In reality, I was at first oblivious to the fact that I was most likely LOSING money overall because of how much energy that little sucker was taking in. But, I was comforted thinking that using that machine was just a practical way of learning about this modern currency and that the loss of several cents’ worth of energy was acceptable in the name of education and learning.
Fast forward ten months to the wonderful summer of 2016. I had recently turned 13 and the Antminer U3 had been running on and off throughout. Various pauses and breaks in mining would be observed, as I had to manually get everything up and running after frequent breaks in the Internet connection. You’d expect my newly-turned-teenage brain to lose interest in Bitcoin as it does with many other gimmicks, but – even surprising myself – I miraculously didn’t. Good thing I maintained interest thinking about it now, not so good at the time for my parents. Why do I say this? I felt like it was time to get a little upgrade in my hardware.

Getting an upgrade

Days passed with me comparing every ASIC miner I could at that price point. It was then I set my eyes upon the Antminer S7 (same folks who did my U3, nice). I had put it up against a plethora of other miners and I figured the S7 was my best bet; the thing costs only about 10 times that of my U3 but could run at 4.73 TH/s, almost 80 times as powerful. The only problem being its power consumption was at 1300 watts, which would put a massive dent in the electricity bill and eliminate any profit I would make. Fortunately, I had a secret weapon up my sleeve – or rather my mum did. She had rented out an office outside our apartment where she would keep files and paperwork. The office’s electricity bill was a flat rate as far as I’m aware and it ended up being my saving grace because it virtually got rid of the “oh no I’m actually going to be losing money because of how much electricity I’m eating up” factor, making this whole hardware upgrade viable.
After convincing my parents, they finally agreed to shell out the requested amount, with the initial investment being paid back with time. I went to a local Bitcoin vendor and purchased 1 BTC for about $665 in cash (sigh yes, I know. $665 dollars). Shortly after, I used about 0.9 BTC to purchase the Antminer S7 and a 1600W power supply for a grand total of $600. The products would be made and shipped from China so I was definitely in for a wait.
A month passes and the package arrives at last. I connected all the wires from the power supply into the S7 and – with great anticipation – I plugged it into the wall to start its first ever run. And what do you know? An extremely loud and high-pitched whirring sound blasted out from the fans on both the power supply as well as the S7. After killing the thing, I questioned my choices. I couldn’t dare put that thing anywhere near my mum’s office in the event it drive everyone in the building absolutely nuts. I was at a loss. However, I soon recovered from my temporarily debilitated state and got working on a solution.
The first idea that came to my mind: change the fans. The stocks fans were by Evercool and spun at around 3000 RPM. The power supply used a small, robust fan that looked like a cube that must’ve spun at extremely high speeds judging by how high the sound it produced was. I got my parents to give me some more funding so I could acquire the replacement fans and I did. Bust. After installation and testing, none of the fans would work. I managed to configure the S7 to connect to my Antpool account and the machine would manage mining for several minutes running at peak performance but ultimately be automatically cut off because of how hot the machine was getting (I’m talking about 80 degrees Celsius kinda hot in that thing). The fans got refunded and I was back to the drawing board.
After combing through some forum posts and videos, I came across this video and a forum post in which people have their mining rigs placed inside a ventilated, muffled cabinet. Undertaking a project like this would be time-consuming and risky but I had no better ideas so I decided to go through with the idea anyway.
Firstly, I sought out a cabinet with suitable dimensions. I managed to get just what I needed at a second-hand IKEA shop. Great. Secondly, I went ahead and acquired some sound-absorbing acoustic foam from a local provider. Fantastic. Finally I had to get a ventilation system going within the cabinet, otherwise, all the hot air would roast the machine alive in there in a bloody mess. With the help of my dad, we found a pair cabinet fans on the Internet that were close to silent but could circulate the air well enough.
Eventually, all the materials came and, with the help of my parents, put everything together. The process took quite long time and we had a couple hiccups along the way, but we got it done and it came out pretty nice.
The moment of truth came and, to my relief, it ran so much quieter than without the cabinet. It was nowhere near silent but it reduced the noise a great deal. Soon after, I got the thing into the office and set everything up from there. Unfortunately, I was forced to underclock it because you could still hear the machine’s whining from outside the thin office door. Gunning the hashrate down about 25% to 3.7TH/s, I could lower the fan speed without risking the machine burning up. Sure, I wasn’t getting the full potential of the machine but I didn’t complain because electricity was not an issue there and it was still a whole lot better than my U3. With it up and running, I could leave it there, periodically checking to see if it was mining on Antpool.

The aftermath

In the months that followed, I was getting a solid $2.5 worth of BTC on daily basis. Half a year later, May of 2017, I had accumulated a satisfactory $600. I thought, “At this rate, I’d be able to pay my parents’ investment back in a few months” (the total investment came close to $900). Bitcoin had risen to over $1500 so I was already over the moon at that point because of how well everything was going. Little did I know…
I hit 0.5 BTC midway through September this year. The price of BTC had dropped after a sudden rise to $5000, but I couldn’t have asked for more. Although I possessed only half the amount of BTC I paid for the machine, its value was over twice that of the initial investment. I thought BTC would level off at around $4000 but nope.
In the month of October, the price skyrocketed. Since September, I had only mined 0.017 BTC but the value was already over $3000. It was just a matter of selling it, but I decided to hodl. Good thing I did.
As of November 5, I have approximately 0.52 BTC mined in total from my S7, valued at $4000. If I were to sell it right now, I’d have a profit of over $3100. And as for my miner, it’s churning out 0.0006 BTC daily, sounds like nothing but it’s still the equivalent of $5 today and I couldn’t be happier, at least with the miner and Bitcoin.
You remember that $665 for 1 BTC that I mentioned earlier? In hindsight, it would’ve been such a better idea to just keep that one Bitcoin and not do anything with it until today (in the interest of making much more money), as I’d theoretically have upwards of $7000. The idea of that still haunts me sometimes if I dwell on it too long but knowing that I’m in possession of an already hefty amount, the pain of it had numbed slightly. It’s not all doom and gloom for me from the exponential increase in Bitcoin’s value, however. Those first $0.3 payments from my humble little U3 all those years ago now are now the equivalent of over $6 today!
Bitcoin and everything it encompasses has been and still is a journey of discovery and an adventure. Looking back, starting with a modest €60 Antminer U3 to having a sum of Bitcoin equivalent to two extremely high-end gaming rigs (first thing I could think of as a comparison, sorry) has been something I can’t really describe. Through the course of the past few years, I’ve learned more about technology, I’ve unexpectedly gotten insight into economics and business and – of course – I’ve made a lot of money (if I decide to stop hodling that is).
Also, props to my parents for keeping an open mind throughout, I know some parents would be horrified at their kids being involved in something that has been used in some less-than-savoury ways and it's great knowing mine have been supportive all the way.
TL;DR got into Bitcoin mining 3 years ago at age 11 with an Antminer U3 that ran at 60 GH/s, got an Antminer S7 (4.73TH/s) and built a sound-muffling, ventilated cabinet for it. Am sat here today with $3000 profit if I decide to sell right now.
submitted by xx_riptide_xx to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Best of Buttcoin: 2014

There's been some fantastic work done in this subreddit spreading disinformation researching, criticising, and debunking bitcoin and its sacred cows over the past year, which I would like to celebrate.
So here's some posts I saved on bitcoin-related topics. But I started saving things too late... So if you have and/or remember any great posts from the past year, dig them up and post them here.
Also, unironically, maybe someone should start a buttcoin wiki

First, three pieces of investigative journalism from Buttcoin's top minds. Here Charlie_Shrem examines the environmental impact of bitcoin mining. Key finding: For every Bitcoin transaction, 47 kilograms of CO2 is released into the atmosphere from the miners alone.
Current hash rate: 261,900,382 GH/s
Number of transactions per day: 71,331
If we assume rather conservatively that 1GH/s = 1 watt on average, then this would mean 261,900,382W is being used to power the network. We can simplify this to 261,900 kW.
Some miners can do better than 1W per 1GH/s, but many if not most do worse (i.e. 2W per 1GH/s to 10W per 1GH/s).
Going by the figure of 0.527kg CO2 / kWh found on this page,
0.527kg CO2 x 261,900 kW x 24 hours = 3,312,511.2 kg CO2 per day
Now,
3,312,511.2 kg CO2 / 71,331 transactions = 46.44 kg CO2 per transaction
For comparison, even going by this Coindesk Article, an ATM produces daily 3.162kg in CO2 emissions.
0.25kwH x 0.527kg CO2 x 24 hours = 3.162kg/day.
That means that the carbon emission for one Bitcoin transaction is equivalent to about 15 ATMs processing perhaps hundreds or thousands of transactions in a day combined.

Earlier this month Frankeh abruptly interrupted remittance-focused annular onanism by issuing a challenge: to find a single instance where bitcoin works out cheaper than a fiat alternative. In case you need to ask... Nope.
Right, there's a bunch of circlejerking happening in /Bitcoin right now so I think it's time to cut through the bullshit one way or another.
Country to send money to.
The biggest remittance markets are China, Indian and the Philippines.
I believe that since /Bitcoin often gives the Philippines as an example of successful Bitcoin remittance then it is the perfect country to use in our challenge.
Country to send money from.
According to this wikipedia article Malaysia and Canada have the biggest expat Filipino communities. 900,000 and 500,000.
So I think we should do the calculations based on both countries.
The methodology
Most people are not paid in Bitcoin. This is a fact. So for our calculation you must start with fiat, and end in fiat. We're not doing these calculations based on future utility of Bitcoin (No, neo. I'm saying...), we're doing them on the current utility.
We will also be doing a bank to bank remittance, because that is nice an constant. We don't need to take into account pick up locations Bitcoin remittance allows and pick up locations normal remittance allows. They'll vary too much.
Time will also not be taken into account, as time doesn't actually matter when it comes to remittance. Now, Bitcoiners might shout about this particular rule but let me explain my logic behind this.
A foreign worker gets paid every Friday. They start the remittance process on the Friday and regardless of if it takes 0, 3, or 5 days their family back in their home country just needs to base their life around money coming in on remitters pay day + 0, 3, or 5 days. Time taken is of no real value when it comes to remittance. All that matters is that it consistently arrives on day x.
As such, any remittance services that take over 5 working days are to be ignored for the sake of this challenge.
The amount
The amount is going to be 25% of the average wage in each of the countries. This isn't extremely scientific because it doesn't particularly need to be, and the figures are hard to come by.
So 1826.75 MYR for Malaysia and 1,398 CAD for Canada.
Don't bother complaining about these, they're just examples.
Few more ground rules
  • We're going to be going from bank/bank card to bank regardless, so we're not interested in banking fees on either side. They will be the same regardless of Bitcoin or WU (for example)
  • It must be from local fiat to foreign fiat.. You can't palm off the conversion fee to the receivers bank to keep fees down.
  • Any remittance service can be used, as long as Bitcoin is involved for people fighting the Bitcoin corner and Bitcoin isn't used for people fighting the WU (or similar) corner.
  • You must go through the process and document all the fees for each. Fees to look out for are currency spreads, transaction fees on exchanges, etc

Finally a recent thread, but commendable all the same. Hodldown presents some research leading to facts overturning years of knowledge in the bitcoin wiki. Even us shills have been laughing at bitcoin's pathetic capability of 7 transactions per second. It turns out, we were out by at least a factor of 2:
The average number of transactions per block right now is: 665 transactions
The average block size is 0.372731752748842mb.
That means the average transaction is 0.00056049887mb. Which means 1mb of transactions (the limit) is 1784 transactions
Assuming a 10 minute block (a whole other can of worms) that means there is 10*60 seconds.
1784/600 isn't 7. It's a 2.97.
Bitcoin at a technical level can not handle even 3 transactions per second.

In one of the frequent bitcoin user invasions, PayingWithActualMone outlines why the "solution in search of a problem" isn't that great of a solution to much either.
On the transaction side: the Bitcoin community seems convinced that banks are ripping them off (which imo they are not), and that it can be fixed by applying some magicsauce over a transaction that is facilitated by banks regardless. So far in practice I haven't seen any evidence of the 'fast' 'cheap' and 'easy' transactions, like most recently with Mollie. They usually compare the fees of BTC>BTC transactions to the fees of Chase Mastercard > a fucking nomad in the Sahara (with consumer protection) to prove their point. The community also seems convinced that the entire world banks the way America does, not realizing that in Europe banking has been dirt cheap for years.
And the security... oh boy the security. Half the population can't manage to go without a virus for one year (not an actual statistic), and now you expect them to secure their coins? People are dumb as shit, and software is always one step behind the exploits. We could of course create Bitcoin banks, but then there isn't much left of the original idea.
On the 'intrinsic value' side: what the hell is wrong with people. If the underlying product is no good in any aspect, why is it worth much? Right now (that's like 5 years after introduction mind you) BTC is used in 3 types of transactions: Silk Road, SatoshiDice & extremely questionable transactions. It does its job well in that aspect, and that's all it will ever be. The community just turned the technology into a giant ponzi, and they don't care as long as they get paid. The people actually doing business in Bitcoin probably don't care about the price that much.

Someone who deleted their account, on the argument that merchant adoption is a cause of the price drop:
That's just an excuse butters use for the price going down.
There's no real difference between selling bitcoin for fiat and exchanging bitcoin for goods and services. Both are a form of sale of bitcoin, an expression of preference for something other than bitcoin.
If on balance, there's more flow of bitcoin into fiat, goods or services than there is a corresponding opposing flow, then it is simply the market expressing the view that bitcoin is overvalued. Therefore, the reduction in the value of bitcoin (as valued in fiat) is a sincere expression of the market's view of what the correct price for bitcoin is.
Think of an example: A true believer has 20 BTC. He exchanges 10 BTC with Dell for a whizzy server. Dell (or another intermediary) sell the 10 BTC at an exchange in return for fiat. The market price of BTC goes down.
The price goes down, simply because a true believer cut his bitcoin holding, he got out. He thought having a server now was worth more to him than 10 tickets to the moon. Which is an expression of a negative view of the future value of bitcoin. A simple "aggressive" sale in trading parlance.

A late entry from jstolfi. A concise description of the Satoshi/Bitcoin origin story .
My understanding is that "Satoshi" had been trying to solve the technical problem of convincing a bunch of anonymous, volunteers to maintain and protect a distributed ledger, with no central authority.
He thought that he had a solution, in the form of a protocol that included PoW, miner rewards, longest chain, etc. The solution seemed to work on paper; but, as a good scientist, he started an experiment in order to check whether it would also work in practice.
For that experiment to be meaningful, it would have been enough if the coin was mined for several years only by a few hundred computer nerds, with the cooperation of some friendly pizza places and bars.
The US$ price of the coin was not important to the experiment, and it was never meant to be a weapon for libertarians, a way to buy drugs or evade taxes, a competitor to credit cards or Western Union, a sound investment or item for day-trading. All those "goals" were tacked onto it afterwards.

bob237 comments on the the absurdity of coinbase and it's touted 'rebuy' scheme,
It gets even better than that, actually. A lot of bitcoiners don't like 'losing' bitcoin, and so coinbase added a popular 'repurchase bitcoin' feature that automatically debits your bank account to replenish the BTC in your coinbase account after a purchase.
The ultimate result then is that you pay coinbase fiat, they take their cut, and then send that fiat on to the merchant. All 'bitcoins' used in the middle of the transaction are not really bitcoins, but just abstractions in coinbase's internal [off-chain] accounting system.
It's a crap version of paypal, no consumer protection and a ton of fees hidden in the spread when you buy your chuck-e-cheese tokens from them.

saigonsquare explains why ubiquitous tipping isn't the the killer app that it has been touted as, and why bitcoiners may fail to grasp this
Most people understand that there are different sorts of interaction. There are purely social interactions, there are quid-pro-quo interactions, and there are market interactions. Mixing those up causes embarrassment and insult. I wouldn't try to pay my mother-in-law ten bucks for cooking Christmas dinner, and I certainly wouldn't try to pay her ten cents. If a waiter suggests I try the raspberry tart, I won't get away with offering to bake him some cookies next week in compensation; if an office mate suggests I have a slice of her birthday cake, I'll be insulted if she brings me a bill for it. If I spend an hour helping my friend move apartments and he thanks me, I'm fine; we're friends helping each other out. If he pays me two bucks, I'm insulted; he's canceled the social nature of the interaction and instead simply bought my labor for a fraction of its going rate. I'm up two bucks but down a friend.
Ancapspergers, not particularly understanding any sort of interaction more complicated than buying a cheeseburger at Wendy's, assume that all interactions are a form of market transaction, and set pricing accordingly. Normal humans get offended by a penny shaving, because it cancels the social nature of the interaction and turns it into a market transaction--and then informs the recipient that his contribution to the transaction was of negligible value.
submitted by occasionallyrude to Buttcoin [link] [comments]

The Concept of Bitcoin

The Concept of Bitcoin
https://preview.redd.it/5r9soz2ltq421.jpg?width=268&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=6a89685f735b53ec1573eefe08c8646970de8124
What is Bitcoin?
Bitcoin is an experimental system of transfer and verification of property based on a network of peer to peer without any central authority.
The initial application and the main innovation of the Bitcoin network is a system of digital currency decentralized unit of account is bitcoin.
Bitcoin works with software and a protocol that allows participants to issue bitcoins and manage transactions in a collective and automatic way. As a free Protocol (open source), it also allows interoperability of software and services that use it. As a currency bitcoin is both a medium of payment and a store of value.
Bitcoin is designed to self-regulate. The limited inflation of the Bitcoin system is distributed homogeneously by computing the network power, and will be limited to 21 million divisible units up to the eighth decimal place. The functioning of the Exchange is secured by a general organization that everyone can examine, because everything is public: the basic protocols, cryptographic algorithms, programs making them operational, the data of accounts and discussions of the developers.
The possession of bitcoins is materialized by a sequence of numbers and letters that make up a virtual key allowing the expenditure of bitcoins associated with him on the registry. A person may hold several key compiled in a 'Bitcoin Wallet ', 'Keychain' web, software or hardware which allows access to the network in order to make transactions. Key to check the balance in bitcoins and public keys to receive payments. It contains also (often encrypted way) the private key associated with the public key. These private keys must remain secret, because their owner can spend bitcoins associated with them on the register. All support (keyrings) agrees to maintain the sequence of symbols constituting your keychain: paper, USB, memory stick, etc. With appropriate software, you can manage your assets on your computer or your phone.
Bitcoin on an account, to either a holder of bitcoins in has given you, for example in Exchange for property, either go through an Exchange platform that converts conventional currencies in bitcoins, is earned by participating in the operations of collective control of the currency.
The sources of Bitcoin codes have been released under an open source license MIT which allows to use, copy, modify, merge, publish, distribute, sublicense, and/or sell copies of the software, subject to insert a copyright notice into all copies.
Bitcoin creator, Satoshi Nakamoto
What is the Mining of bitcoin?
Technical details :
During mining, your computer performs cryptographic hashes (two successive SHA256) on what is called a header block. For each new hash, mining software uses a different random number that called Nuncio. According to the content of the block and the nonce value typically used to express the current target. This number is called the difficulty of mining. The difficulty of mining is calculated by comparing how much it is difficult to generate a block compared to the first created block. This means that a difficulty of 70000 is 70000 times more effort that it took to Satoshi Nakamoto to generate the first block. Where mining was much slower and poorly optimized.
The difficulty changes each 2016 blocks. The network tries to assign the difficulty in such a way that global computing power takes exactly 14 days to generate 2016 blocks. That's why the difficulty increases along with the power of the network.
Material :
In the beginning, mining with a processor (CPU) was the only way to undermine bitcoins. (GPU) graphics cards have possibly replaced the CPU due to their nature, which allowed an increase between 50 x to 100 x in computing power by using less electricity by megahash compared to a CPU.
Although any modern GPU can be used to make the mining, the brand AMD GPU architecture has proved to be far superior to nVidia to undermine bitcoins and the ATI Radeon HD 5870 card was the most economical for a time.
For a more complete list of graphics cards and their performance, see Wiki Bitcoin: comparison of mining equipment
In the same way that transition CPU to GPU, the world of mining has evolved into the use of the Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA) as a mining platform. Although FPGAs did not offer an increase of 50 x to 100 x speed of calculation as the transition from CPU to GPU, they offered a better energy efficiency.
A typical HD/s 600 graphics card consumes about 400w of power, while a typical FPGA device can offer a rate of hash of 826 MH/s to 80w of power consumption, a gain of 5 x more calculations for the same energy power. Since energy efficiency is a key factor in the profitability of mining, it was an important step for the GPU to FPGA migration for many people.
The world of the mining of bitcoin is now migrating to the Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC). An ASIC is a chip designed specifically to accomplish a single task. Unlike FPGAs, an ASIC is unable to be reprogrammed for other tasks. An ASIC designed to undermine bitcoins cannot and will not do anything else than to undermine bitcoins.
The stiffness of an ASIC allows us to offer an increase of 100 x computing power while reducing power consumption compared to all other technologies. For example, a classic device to offer 60 GH/s (1 hashes equals 1000 Megahash. 1GH/s = 1000 Mh/s) while consuming 60w of electricity. Compared to the GPU, it is an increase in computing power of 100 x and a reduction of power consumption by a factor of 7.
Unlike the generations of technologies that have preceded the ASIC, ASIC is the "end of the line" when we talk about important technology change. The CPUs have been replaced by the GPUs, themselves replaced by FPGAs that were replaced by ASICs.
There is nothing that can replace the ASICs now or in the immediate future. There will be technological refinements in ASIC products, and improvements in energy efficiency, but nothing that may match increased from 50 x to 100 x the computing power or a 7 x reduction in power consumption compared with the previous technology.
Which means that the energy efficiency of an ASIC device is the only important factor of all product ASIC, since the estimated lifetime of an ASIC device is superior to the entire history of the mining of bitcoin. It is conceivable that a purchased ASIC device today is still in operation in two years if the unit still offers a profitable enough economic to keep power consumption. The profitability of mining is also determined by the value of bitcoin but in all cases, more a device has a good energy efficiency, it is profitable.
Software :
There are two ways to make mining: by yourself or as part of a team (a pool). If you are mining for yourself, you must install the Bitcoin software and configure it to JSON-RPC (see: run Bitcoin). The other option is to join a pool. There are multiple available pools. With a pool, the profit generated by any block generated by a member of the team is split between all members of the team. The advantage of joining a team is to increase the frequency and stability of earnings (this is called reduce the variance) but gains will be lower. In the end, you will earn the same amount with the two approaches. Undermine solo allows you to receive earnings huge but very infrequent, while miner with a pool can offer you small stable and steady gains.
Once you have your software configured or that you have joined a pool, the next step is to configure the mining software. The software the most populare for ASIC/FPGA/GPU currently is CGminer or a derivative designed specifically for FPGAS and ASICs, BFGMiner.
If you want a quick overview of mining without install any software, try Bitcoin Plus, a Bitcoin minor running in your browser with your CPU. It is not profitable to make serious mining, but it is a good demonstration of the principle of the mining team.
submitted by Josephbitcoin to u/Josephbitcoin [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Mining & The Beauty Of Capitalism

Authored by Valentin Schmid via The Epoch Times,
While the price of bitcoin drops, miners get more creative... and some flourish.
The bitcoin price is crashing; naysayers and doomsayers are having a field day. The demise of the dominant cryptocurrency is finally happening — or is it?
Bitcoin has been buried hundreds of times, most notably during the brutal 90 percent decline from 2013 to 2015. And yet it has always made a comeback.
Where the skeptics are correct: The second bitcoin bubble burst in December of last year and the price is down roughly 80 percent from its high of $20,000. Nobody knows whether and when it will see these lofty heights again.
As a result, millions of speculators have been burned, and big institutions haven’t showed up to bridge the gap.
This also happened on a smaller scale in 2013 after a similar 100x run-up, and it was necessary.

Time to Catch Up

What most speculators and even some serious proponents of the independent and decentralized monetary system don’t understand: Bitcoin needs these pauses to make improvements in its infrastructure.
Exchanges, which could not handle the trading volumes at the height of the frenzy and did not return customer service inquiries, can take a breather and upgrade their systems and hire capable people.
The technology itself needs to make progress and this needs time. Projects like the lightning network, a system which delivers instant bitcoin payments at very little cost and at virtually unlimited scale is now only available to expert programmers.
A higher valuation is only justified if these improvements reach the mass market.
And since we live in a world where everything financial is tightly regulated, for better or worse, this area also needs to catch up, since regulators are chronically behind the curve of technological progress.
And of course, there is bitcoin mining. The vital infrastructure behind securing the bitcoin network and processing its transactions has been concentrated in too few hands and in too few places, most notably China, which still hosts about 70 percent of the mining capacity.

The Case For Mining

Critics have always complained that bitcoin mining consumes “too much” electricity, right now about as much as the Czech Republic. In energy terms this is around 65 terawatt hours or 230,000,000 gigajoules, costing $3.3 billion dollars according to estimates by Digiconomist.
For the non-physicists among us, this is around as much as consumed by six million energy-guzzling U.S. households per year.
All those estimates are imprecise because the aggregate cannot know how much energy each of the different bitcoin miners consumes and how much that electricity costs. But they are a reasonable rough estimate.
So it’s worth exploring why mining is necessary to begin with and whether the electricity consumption is justified.
Anything and everything humans do consumes resources. The question then is always: Is it worth it? And: Who decides?
This question then leads to the next question: Is it worth having and using money? Most people would argue yes, because using money instead of barter in fact makes economic transactions faster and cheaper and thus saves resources, natural and human.

_Merchants exchange goods with the inhabitants of Tidore, Indonesia, circa 1550. Barter was supplanted by using money because it is more efficient. (Archive/Getty Images)_If we are generously inclined, we will grant bitcoin the status of a type of money or at least currency as it meets the general requirements of being recognizable, divisible, portable, durable, is accepted in exchange for other goods and services, and in this case it is even limited in supply.
So having any type of money has a price, whether it’s gold, dollar bills, or numbers on the screen of your online banking system. In the case of bitcoin, it’s the electricity and the capital for the computing equipment, as well as the human resources to run these operations.
If we think having money in general is a good idea and some people value the decentralized and independent nature of bitcoin then it would be worth paying for verifying transactions on the bitcoin network as well as keeping the network secure and sound: Up until the point where the resources consumed would outweigh the efficiency benefits. Just like most people don’t think it’s a bad idea to use credit cards and banks, which consume electricity too.
However, bitcoin is a newcomer and this is why it’s being scrutinized even more so than the old established players.

Different Money, Different Costs

How many people know how much electricity, human lives, and other resources gold mining consumes or has consumed in the course of history? What about the banking system? Branches, servers, air-conditioning, staff? What about printing dollar notes and driving them around in armored trucks?
What about the social effects of monetary mismanagement of bank and government money like inflation as well as credit deflations? Gold gets a pass here.
Most people haven’t asked that question, which is why it’s worth pointing out the only comprehensive study done on the topic in 2014. In “An Order of Magnitude” the engineer Hass McCook analyzes the different money systems and reaches mind-boggling conclusions.
The study is a bit dated and of course the aggregations are also very rough estimates, but the ball park numbers are reasonable and the methodology sound.
In fact, according to the study, bitcoin is the most economic of all the different forms of money.
Gold mining in 2014 used 475 million GJ, compared to bitcoin’s 230 million in 2018. The banking system in 2014 used 2.3 billion gigajoules.
Over 100 people per year die trying to mine gold. But mining costs more than electricity. It consumes around 300,000 liters of water per kilogram of gold mined as well as 150 kilogram (330 pounds) of cyanide and 1500 tons of waste and rubble.
The international banking system has been used in all kinds of fraudulent activity throughout history: terrorist financing, money laundering, and every other criminal activity under the sun at a cost of trillions of dollars and at an order of magnitude higher than the same transactions done with cryptocurrency and bitcoin.
And of course, while gold has a relatively stable value over time, our bank and government issued money lost about 90 percent of its purchasing power over the last century, because it can be created out of thin air. This leads to inflation and a waste of physical and human resources because it distorts the process of capital allocation.

_The dollar has lost more than 90 percent of its value since the creation of the Federal Reserve in 1913. (Source: St. Louis Fed)_This is on top of the hundreds of thousands of bank branches, millions of ATMs and employees which all consume electricity and other resources, 10 times as much electricity alone as the bitcoin network.
According to monetary philosopher Saifedean Ammous, author of “The Bitcoin Standard,” the social benefit of hard money, i.e. money that can’t be printed by government decree, cannot even be fathomed; conversely, the true costs of easy money—created by government fiat and bank credit—are difficult to calculate.
According to Ammous, bitcoin is the hardest money around, even harder than gold because its total supply is capped, whereas the gold supply keeps increasing at about 1-2 percent every year.
“Look at the era of the classical gold standard, from 1871, the end of the Franco–Prussian War, until the beginning of World War I. There’s a reason why this is known as the Golden Era, the Gilded Age, and La Belle Epoque. It was a time of unrivaled human flourishing all over the world. Economic growth was everywhere. Technology was being spread all over the world. Peace and prosperity were increasing everywhere around the world. Technological innovations were advancing.
“I think this is no coincidence. What the gold standard allowed people to do is to have a store of value that would maintain its value in the future. And that gave people a low time preference, that gave people the incentive to think of the long term, and that made people want to invest in things that would pay off over the long term … bitcoin is far closer to gold. It is a digital equivalent of gold,” he said in an interview with The Epoch Times.
Of course, contrary to the gold standard that Ammous talks about, bitcoin doesn’t have a track record of being sound money in practice. In theory it meets all the criteria, but in the real world it hasn’t been adopted widely and has been so volatile as to be unusable as a reliable store of value or as the underlying currency of a productive lending market.
The proponents argue that over time, these problems will be solved the same way gold spread itself throughout the monetary sphere replacing copper and seashells, but even Ammous concedes the process may take decades and the outcome is far from certain. Gold is the safe bet for sound money, bitcoin has potential.
There is another measure where bitcoin loses out, according to a recent study by researchers from the Oak Ridge Institute in Cincinnati, Ohio.
It is the amount of energy expended per dollar for different monetary instruments. One dollar worth of bitcoin costs 17 megajoules to mine versus five for gold and seven for platinum. But the study omits the use of cyanide, water, and other physical resources in mining physical metals.
In general, the comparisons in dollar terms go against bitcoin because it is worth relatively less, only $73 billion in total at the time of writing. An issue that could be easily fixed at a higher price, but a higher price is only justified if the infrastructure improves, adoption increases, volatility declines, and the network proves its resilience to attacks over time.
In the meantime, market participants still value the fact they can own a currency independent of the government, completely digital, easily fungible, and limited in supply, and relatively decentralized. And the market as a whole is willing to pay a premium for these factors reflected in the higher per dollar prices for mining bitcoin.

The Creativity of Bitcoin Mining

But where bitcoin mining lacks in scale, it makes up for it in creativity.
In theory—and in practice—bitcoin mining can be done anywhere where there is cheap electricity. So bitcoin mining operations can be conducted not where people are (banking) or where government is (fiat cash) or where gold is (gold mining)—it can be done everywhere where there is cheap electricity
Some miners are flocking to the heat of the Texan desert where gas is virtually available for free, thanks to another oil revolution.
Other miners go to places where there is cheap wind, water, or other renewable energy.
This is because they don’t have to build bank branches, printing presses, and government buildings, or need to put up excavators and conveyor belts to dig gold out of the ground.
All they need is internet access and a home for the computers that look like a shipping container, each one of which has around 200 specialized bitcoin mining computers in them.
“The good thing about bitcoin mining is that it doesn’t matter where on earth a transaction happens, we can verify it in our data center here. The miners are part of the decentralized philosophy of bitcoin, it’s completely independent of your location as well,” said Moritz Jäger, chief technology officer at bitcoin Mining company Northern Bitcoin AG.

Centralized Mining

But so far, this decentralization hasn’t worked out as well as it sounds in theory.
Because Chinese local governments had access to subsidized electricity, it was profitable for officials to cut deals with bitcoin mining companies and supply them with cheap electricity in exchange for jobs and cutbacks. Sometimes the prices were as low as 2 dollar cents to 4 dollar cents per kilowatt hour.
This is why the majority of bitcoin mining is still concentrated in China (around 70 percent) where it was the most profitable, but only because the Chinese central planners subsidized the price of electricity.
This set up led to the by and large unwanted result that the biggest miner of bitcoin, a company called Bitmain, is also the biggest manufacturer of specialized computing equipment for bitcoin mining. The company reported revenues of $2.8 billion for the first half of 2018.

Tourists walk on the dunes near a power plant in Xiangshawan Desert in Ordos of Inner Mongolia, in this file photo. bitcoin miners have enjoyed favorable electricity rates in places like Ordos for a long time. (Feng Li/Getty Images)Centralized mining is a problem because whenever there is one player or a conglomerate of players who control more than 50 percent of the network computing power, they could theoretically crash the network by spending the same bitcoin twice, the so called “double spending problem.“
They don’t have an incentive to do so because it would probably ruin the bitcoin price and their business, but it’s better not to have to rely on one group of people controlling an entire money system. After all, we have that exact same system with central banking and bitcoin was set up as a decentralized alternative.
So far, no player or conglomerate ever reached that 51 percent threshold, at least not since bitcoin’s very early days, but many market participants always thought Bitmain’s corner of the market is a bit too close for comfort.
This favorable environment for Chinese bitcoin mining has been changing with a crack down on local government electricity largess as well as a crackdown on cryptocurrency.
Bitcoin itself and mining bitcoin remain legal in China but cryptocurrency exchanges have been banned since late 2017.
But more needs to be done for bitcoin to become independent of the caprice of a centralized oppressive regime and local government bureaucrats.

Northern Bitcoin Case Study

Enter Northern Bitcoin AG. The company isn’t the only one which is exploring mining opportunities with renewable energies in locations other than China.
But it is special because of the extraordinary set up it has for its operations, the fact that it is listed on the stock exchange in Germany, and the opportunities for scaling it discovered.
The operations of Northern Bitcoin combine the beauties of bitcoin and capitalism in one.
Like Texas has a lot of oil and free gas and it makes sense to use the gas rather than burn it, Norway has a lot of water, especially water moving down the mountains due to rainfall and melting snow.
And it makes sense to use the power of the movement of the water, channel it through pipes into generators to create very cheap and almost unlimited electricity. Norway generates north of 95 percent of its total electricity from hydropower.

A waterfall next to a hydropowerplant near Sandane, Norway, Oct. 25, 2018. (Valentin Schmid/The Epoch Times)Capitalism does not distinguish between renewable and fossil. It uses what is the most expedient. In this case, it is clearly water in Norway, and gas in Texas.
As a side note on the beauties of real capital and the fact that capital and the environment need not be enemies, the water in one of the hydropowerplants close to the Northern Bitcoin facility is piped through a generator made in 1920 by J.M. Voith AG, a company from Heidenheim Germany.
The company was established in 1867 and is still around today. The generator was produced in 1920 and is still producing electricity today.

Excess Power

In the remote regions of Northern Norway, there aren’t that many people or industry who would use the electricity. And rather than transport it over hundreds of miles to the industrial centers of Europe, the industries of the future are moving to Norway to the source of the cheap electricity.
Of course, it is not just bitcoin mining, but other data and computing heavy operations like server farms for cloud computing that can be neatly packaged into one of those containers and shipped up north.
“The containers are beautiful. They are produced in the middle of Germany where the hardware is enabled and tested. Then we put it on a truck and send it up here. When the truck arrives on the outside we lift it on the container vehicle. Two hours after the container arrives, it’s in the container rack. And 40 hours later we enable the cooling, network, power, other systems, and it’s online,” said Mats Andersson, a spokesman for the Lefdal Mine data center in Måløy, Norway, where Northern Bitcoin has its operations. Plug and play.

A Northern Bitcoin data container inside the Lefdal Mine data center, in Måløy, Norway. (Northern Bitcoin)If the cheap electricity wasn’t enough—around 5 cents per kilowatt hour compared to 17 cents in Germany—Norway also provides the perfect storage for these data containers, which are normally racked up in open air parks above the ground.
Also here, the resource allocation is beautiful. Instead of occupying otherwise useful and beautiful parcels of land and nature, the Northern Bitcoin containers and others are stored in the old Lefdal olivine mine.
Olivine is a mineral used for steel production and looks green. Very fitting. Hence also the name of the data center: Lefdal Mine.
“We take the green mineral out and we take the green IT in,” said Andersson.

Efficiency, Efficiency

Using the old mine as storage for the data center makes the whole process even more resource efficient.
Why? So far, we’ve only been talking about bitcoin mining using a lot of energy. But what for? Before you have actually seen the process in action—and it is similar for other computing operations—you cannot imagine how bizarre it is.
Most of the electricity is used to prevent the computers from overheating. So it’s not even the processors themselves; it’s the fans which cool the computer that use the most juice.
This is where the mine helps, because it’s rather cool 160 meters (525 feet) below sea level; certainly cooler than in the Texas desert.
But it gets even better. On top of the air blow-cooling the computer, the Lefdal data center uses a fresh water system to pump through the containers in pipes.
The fans can then circulate air over the cool pipes which transfer the heat to the water. One can feel the difference when touching the different pipes.
The fresh water closed circle loop then completes the “green” or resource efficiency cycle by transferring its heat to ice cold water from the nearby Fjord.
The water is sucked in through a pipe from the Fjord, the heat gets transferred without the water being mixed, and the water flows back to the Fjord, without any impact on the environment.
To top it all off, the mine has natural physical security far better than open air data centers and is even protected from an electromagnetic pulse blast because it’s underground.

_The Nordfjord near Måløy, Norway. The Lefdal data center takes the cold water from the fjord and uses it to cool the computer inside the mine. (Valentin Schmid/The Epoch Times)_Company Dynamics

Given this superlative set up, Northern Bitcoin wants to ramp up production as fast as possible at the Lefdal mine and other similar places in Norway, which have more mountains where data centers can be housed.
At the moment, Northern Bitcoin has 15 containers with 210 mining machines each. The 15 containers produce around 5 bitcoin per day at a total cost of around $2,500 dollars at the end of November 2018 and after the difficulty of solving the math problems went down by ~17 percent.
Most of it is for electricity; the rest is for leasing the containers, renting the mine space, buying and writing off the mining computers, personnel, overhead, etc.
Even at the current relatively depressed prices of around $4000, that’s a profit of $1500 per bitcoin or $7,500 per day.
But the goal is to ramp it up to 280 containers until 2019, producing 100 bitcoin per day. Again, the company is in the sweet spot to do this.
As opposed to the beginning of the year when one could not procure a mining computer from Bitmain even if one’s life depended on it, the current bear market has made them cheap and relatively available both new and second had from miners who had to cease operations because they can’t produce at low bitcoin prices.

Northern Bitcoin containers inside the Lefdal Mine data center in Måløy, Norway. (Northern Bitcoin)What about the data shipping containers? They are manufactured by a company called Rittal who is the world market leader. So it helps that the owner of Rittal also owns 30 percent of the Lefdal mine, providing preferential access to the containers.
Northern Bitcoin said it has enough capital available for the intermediate goal of ramping up to 50 containers until the end of year but may tap the capital markets again for the next step.
The company can also take advantage of the lower German corporate tax rate because revenue is only recorded when the bitcoin are sold in Germany, not when they are mined in Norway.
Of course, every small-cap stock—especially bitcoin companies—have their peculiarities and very high risks. As an example, Northern Bitcoin’s financial statements, although public, aren’t audited.
The equipment in the Lefdal mine in Norway is real and the operations are controlled by the Lefdal personnel, but one has to rely on exclusive information from the company for financials and cost figures, so buyer beware.

Norway Powerhouse?

Northern Bitcoin wants to have 280 containers, representing around 5 percent of the network’s computing power.
But the Lefdal mine alone has a capacity to power and cool 1,500 containers in a 200 megawatt facility, once it is fully built out.
“Here you have all the space, power, and cooling that you need. … Here you can grow,” said Lefdal’s Andersson.

A mine shaft in the Lefdal Mine data center in Måløy, Norway. The whole mine will have a capacity for 1500 containers once fully built out. (Valentin Schmid/The Epoch Times)The Norwegian government was behind an initiative to bring computing power to Norway and make it one of the prime destinations for data centers at the beginning of this decade.
To that effect, the local governments own part of the utility companies which operate the power plants and own part of the Lefdal Mine and other locations. But even without notable subsidies (i.e. cash payments to companies), market players were able to figure it out, for everybody’s benefit.
The utilities win because they can sell their cheap electricity close to home. The computing companies like IBM and Northern Bitcoin win because they can get cheap electricity, storage, and security. Data center operators like Lefdal win because they can charge rent for otherwise unused and unneeded space.
However, in a recent about face, the central government in Oslo has decided to remove cryptocurrency miners from the list of companies which pay a preferential tax rate on electricity consumption.
Normally, energy intensive companies, including data centers, pay a preferential tax on electricity consumed of 0.48 øre ($0.00056 ). According to a report by Norwegian media Aftenposten, this tax will rise to 16.58 øre ($0.019) in 2019 for cryptocurrency miners exclusively.
The argument by left wing politician Lars Haltbrekken who sponsored the initiative: “Norway cannot continue to provide huge tax incentives for the most dirty form of cryptocurrency output […] [bitcoin] requires a lot of energy and generates large greenhouse gas emissions globally.”
Since Norway generates its electricity using hydro, precisely the opposite is true: No greenhouse gas emissions, or any emissions for that matter would be produced, if all cryptomining was done in Norway. As opposed to China, where mining is done with coal and with emissions.
But not only in Norway is the share of renewable and emission free energy high. According to research by Coinshares, Bitcoin’s consumes about 77.6 percent of its energy in the form of renewables globally.
However self-defeating the arguments against bitcoin mining in Norway, the political initiative is moving forward. What it means for Northern Bitcoin is not clear, as they house their containers in Lefdal’s mixed data center, which also has other clients, like IBM.
“It’s not really decided yet; there are still big efforts from IT sectors and parties who are trying to change it. If the decision is taken it might apply for pure crypto sites rather than mixed data centers, like ours,” said Lefdal’s Andersson.
Even in the worst-case scenario, it would mean an increase from ~5 cents to ~6.9 cents per kilowatt hour, or 30 percent more paid on the electricity by Northern Bitcoin, which at ~$3250 would still rank it among the most competitive producers in the world.
Coinshares estimates the average production price at $6,800 per Bitcoin at $0,05 per kilowatt hour of electricity and an 18-months depreciation schedule, but concedes that a profitable miner could “[depreciate] mining gear over 24-30 months, or [pay] less for mining gear than our estimates.”
Jäger says Northern Bitcoin depreciates the equipment over three years and has obtained very favorable prices from Bitmain, making its production much more competitive than the average despite the same cost of electricity. In addition, the natural cooling in the mine also reduces electricity costs overall.

Cheap Producer Advantage

At the moment, however, the tax could be the least of any miners worry, as the bitcoin price is in free-fall.
But what happens when the price crashes further? Suffice it to say that there was bitcoin mining when the dollar price was less than 1 cent and there will be bitcoin mining at lower prices thanks to the design of the network.
Mao Shixing, the founder of mining pool F2pool estimated 600,000 miners have shut down since the November crash in price, according to a report by Coindesk.
As it should be in a competitive system, the most energy intensive and obsolete machines are shut down first.
As with every other commodity, when the price drops, some miners will leave the market, leaving space for cheaper competitors to capture a bigger share. But with bitcoin this is a bit simpler than with copper or gold for example.
When a big copper player goes bankrupt, its competitors have to ramp up production and increase cost to increase their market share. With bitcoin, if 3,000 computers get taken off the total mining pool, they won’t be able to mine the approximately 5 bitcoin any longer.
However, because the difficulty of solving the computationally intensive cryptographic tasks of bitcoin decreases automatically when there are fewer computers engaged in the task, the other players just have to leave their machines running at the same rate for the same cost and they will split the 5 bitcoin among them.
“The moment the price goes down, our production price will go down as well,” said Jäger, a process that already happened from November to December when the difficulty decreased twice in November and the beginning of December.
This naturally favors players like Northern Bitcoin, which are producing at the lower end of the cost spectrum. They will be the ones who shut down last.
And this is a good thing. The more companies like Northern Bitcoin, and countries like Norway—even with the extra tax—the more decentralized the bitcoin system.
The more computers there are in different hands mining bitcoin, the more secure the system becomes, because it will be ever more difficult for one player to reach the 50 percent threshold to crash the system. It is this decentralized philosophy which has kept the bitcoin system running for 10 years. Whether at $1 or $20,000.
submitted by rotoreuters to zerohedge [link] [comments]

intro to bitcoin and other cryptos (need help in designing class)

I have become the defacto "Bitcoin expert" in my little down of 50,000 people because I'm the only one talking about it (not because I'm an expert by any means). They have asked me to teach an intro class on bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies. I'm charging $5 for the class and giving them $5 back in a crypto currency (was going to be BTC until I saw the transaction times and fees we're dealing with right now). I figured I'd give the people in the front row $25, they pass back $20, they pass back $15, etc until everyone has $5 left. A quick lesson on how to transact using your phone or laptop.
The class will be two hours long plus an hour Q&A session at the end so I'm trying to cover the basics and a few intermediate ideas so should they come across them (like segwit, etc) they at least have a passing knowledge. I will NOT give any investment advice and I will not get complicated/technical.
I've been working on this syllabus for the last two days and would appreciate some feedback... am I missing something? could I explain things better? anything constructive is welcome. I'm sure some of my explanations are incorrect especially with regard to segwit, transactions, etc... any help is appreciated. Each class is 20 people and it's looking like there will be 4-6 classes based on current demand.
syllabus:
a) What is bitcoin?
b) Why does Bitcoin have value?
c) Parts of bitcoin/terms to know:
d) Interesting things about bitcoin:
e) How to buy/sell:
f) Who takes bitcoin?
g) How to keep bitcoins safe:
h) problems and solutions ahead for BTC
submitted by comp21 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

What am I calculating wrong?

I'm curious to know if I'm even doing this right, because to me, it looks like this card would earn you tons of money (BTC -> USD less electricity charges and hardware costs).
The card says it does 600 GH/s at only 350W. So I used Bitcoin Mining Profitability Calculator and used the auto generated expectations for:
difficulty
btc/block
current conversion rate
electricity cost (I think mine is actually less than .15/kWh, but might as well guess high)
profitability decline
Then I inserted:
hash rate = 600 GH/s
power consumption = 750W (I'm guessing I could run it on something with a power supply this size.
Time Frame = 12 months
Cost of mining hardware = 2196 (how much the card costs... I have plenty of spare computers to place the card in).
And it calculates a HUGE profitability. A first year Net profit of 35593.69 USD.
Honestly, if that's right, why wouldn't everyone use this? I must be doing something wrong, or missing something.
submitted by justgrant2009 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Some pieces I cannot put together

I've been reading extensively on bitcoin for the past few days and there are a few holes here and there that I'm trying to understand. So far it makes me believe that this whole mining thing is some sort of elaborated scam. Here is a few unorganized points that are confusing to me.
Why are other currencies like litecoin slowly becoming popular and why people want them to become popular? What purpose do litecoin serves that bitcoin doesn't? If the second to bitcoin, a redundant currency like litecoin becomes popular and that people want it to become popular, then what's stop more of those currencies to all becoming popular making each of them just spammy/redundant at the end, don't we only need one of those currencies to serve the purpose of worldwide decentered transactions?
The so popular and referred mining hardware comparison sheet gives a list of videocard that are recommended to use. Combined with this calculator people can make some calculations to see if they should invest electricity cost into mining.
Now it seems to yield a little free income at the end of the month, all seems well until you investigate further. The power consumption of your videocard shown there is, in the radeon 6850 case, only half of what it truly use at full usage.
Now to add to this, I've been mining for more than a day at full power without stopping nor interfering in the process. It tells me I should be making 0.0125 bitcoin a day but I barely made half of that in a bit more than a day, yet I am positive the videocard ran at full strength for the whole process.
Now, double electricity cost vs half production, it becomes almost a profitless operation. To this, combined that the current bitcoin value is tenfold what it was 3 months ago, how could it have been profitable back then if it is not right now?
Now another suspicious part to me is those 2 websites 1 2. They offer what every person would ever want, a way to make a lot of money easily.
Both of them deliver their products months after purchase and, the 2nd website especially, is selling something that would potentially pays for itself back in less than a month, after which huge profit would come in. How convenient, to sell something that yields huge profit and pays itself back so quickly, better sell than use ourselves right?
The first site has sold out, and funnily enough are selling the next batch for 75 bitcoin per... which they could just mine themselves faster than their delivery time, so what's their gain really? Conveniently we have the 2nd website, not sold out, selling something similar to the 1st website, without any pictures of what the behind of their miner looks like, who won't mention anywhere the power consumption of their product but say that it comes with a usb cord, plug and play!
That sure not sound fishy at all since the asic counterpart is shown on the comparison sheet as using 600 W, for sure the usb connector hole can output that kind of power right?
Hopefully someone can shed some light on all this to the better understanding of least common asked matters, yet quite important for anyone who wants to jump in this... bandwagon...
I'm legitimately trying to see things optimistically but so far I only see a few root members trying to scam the entire world by projecting this half legit currency world unto us.
Note: sorry for my relatively poor english, I tried putting my thoughts into word as precisely as I could, but I couldn't do it as well as I wish I could.
submitted by StupidButSerious to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

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The Associated Press reports of a Bitcoin heist in Iceland where thieves stole some 600 computers used to "mine" bitcoin and other virtual currencies. "Some 11 people were arrested, including a security guard, in what Icelandic media have dubbed the 'Big Bitcoin Heist,'" reports the Associated Press. Find out if it's profitable to mine Bitcoin, Ethereum, Litecoin, DASH or Monero. Do you think you've got what it takes to join the tough world of cryptocurrency mining? CryptoCompare needs javascript enabled in order to work. Follow these instructions to activate and enable JavaScript in Chrome. PC. To the right of the address bar, click the icon with 3 stacked horizontal lines. From the drop ... GPU Mining. Aside from using ASIC and CPU, you can use graphic cards (GPU).Yes, if you have a gaming computer with a good dedicated graphics card you can use it to mine Bitcoin. This year, Radeon and Nvidia release cards that can mine Bitcoins at comparable rates. A Nvidia GTX 1070 may cost you from $699 to $850.If you use this for gaming for 4 hours, you can allot it to mining for the ... If you are really willing to squeeze every little bit of performance for mining crypto coins with your available hardware you should be aware of the fact that you can also use the most recent Intel integrated graphics cards for mining too. The latest generation of integrated Intel graphics does support OpenCL 1.2 and thus can give you some extra hashrate that is more than yo can get alone out ... Bitcoin mining tempting? Posted on March 10, 2013 by Thong Tran. Yeah, I am, and I’ve been researching and what really motivated me is the current price of Bitcoin, it rised to at the all time high of over $43 per Bitcoin (BTC). Although I’ve already purchased 2 Radeon HD 7970, 1 7850 and a 30 GH/s Butterfly Lab ASIC system will ship eventually in 6 months I think. The motherboard and 3 ...

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